Gospel of the Kingdom

2011/10/24
Good News: The Gospel of the Kingdom
By Apostle Aje Pelser, preached in Harvester Reformational Church, Cape Town, 23rd October 2011.

Here are the origins of Jesus’ Good News for mankind that will translate our souls from darkness to the light of His Kingdom forever.

Origins of the Kingdom of God. Matthew 6:33. Romans 14:17.
As a child Andre used to ask his Sunday school teachers after singing “Seek ye first the kingdom of God”, “where is the kingdom?” 
To which they would reply: “Don’t ask silly questions.” But that enquiry has turned into a life quest that is a key for all citizens of the heavenly kingdom 
Jesus preached about.
When Apostle Andre Pelser completed his final year at Miracle Valley Bible College, the leadership said something along the lines: 
“Isn’t it wonderful that Andre is going to take the Gospel of the Kingdom back to South Africa.”
Apostle Andre’s “eureka” moment came while studying through the Bible at MVBC as he read Romans 14:17 
and realized that the kingdom he was seeking for was in righteousness, peace and joy in the Holy Ghost. He shouted “eureka” like Archimedes did 
when he understood buoyancy and discplacement:
Eureka!
Archimedes’ principle states that the apparent loss in weight of a body that is totally or partially immersed in a liquid is equal to the weight of the liquid 
displaced. Archimedes supposedly formulated this principle after stepping into a bath and watching it overflow. 
According to legend, he became so excited that he ran out into the street naked shouting “Eureka! Eureka!” (“I’ve found it! I’ve found it!”)
Buoyancy is described as the upward thrust exerted upon a body immersed in a fluid. Buoyancy is equal to the weight of the fluid displaced according 
to Archimedes’ principle. Thus a body weighs less when weighed in water, the apparent loss in weight being equal to the weight of the water displaced. 
http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/A/Archimedes_principle.html

Just by the way, the fact that Jesus said to us to come to Him and take his yoke on that is light, can be described as follows: 
When we follow Jesus into the baptism waters of repentance and salvation, we shed the old man of sin with its weights and 
become lighter in our soul! His yoke is easy through baptism, His burden light! That’s good news too and should be a eureka moment of truth for us all!
 
 
Life of Christ Original Quotes – by Dr Roy M. Gray
Dr Gray points out that the Gospel of Matthew explains prophecy of the King fulfilled in Christ’s life:
“His Gospel tells of the King who fulfils all that is written in the Old Testament.”
Also:
“Isaiah 61. Lord God - Lord; good tidings - gospel; meek - poor; bind up - heal; proclaim liberty - preach deliverance; 
recovering of sight to the blind (only New Testament); opening of the prison to them that are bound - set at liberty them that are bruised; 
proclaim - preach;”

Dr Gray asks: “To what occupation are they (disciples) being called?  How does Jesus vividly portray it?” 
And supplies the answer from scripture as usual.
The gospel ministry: “Fishers of men”.

Dr Gray asks the thought provoking question, “What is this Gospel?”
‘The RV of Luke 4.43 has 'preach the good tidings' (or, gospel); what is this gospel?
What does Mark tell of Jesus' preaching tour of Galilee not included in Luke's account?’

The gospel of “the kingdom of God”.
“ ...casting out demons.” Mark emphasizes this aspect of Jesus’ ministry in his Gospel.
” ...those who were with him”, the four He called in JOURNEY 13.
Matthew. More detailed information, “teaching ... preaching ... healing”; extent of His influence given - “all Syria”; 
the tremendous crowds of sick people of all descriptions brought to Jesus.

Luk 4:43 And he said unto them, I must preach(G2097) 
the kingdom of God to other cities also: for therefore am I sent.

G2097 euaggelizo - say: “yoo-ang-ghel-id'-zo”
Thayer Definition:
1) to bring good news, to announce glad tidings
1a) used in the OT of any kind of good news
1a1) of the joyful tidings of God’s kindness, in particular, of the Messianic blessings
1b) in the NT used especially of the glad tidings of the coming kingdom of God, 
and of the salvation to be obtained in it through Christ, and of what relates to this salvation
1c) glad tidings are brought to one, one has glad tidings proclaimed to him
1d) to proclaim glad tidings
1d1) instruct (men) concerning the things that pertain to Christian salvation
Part of Speech: verb
A Related Word by Thayer’s/Strong’s Number: from G2095 and G32
Citing in TDNT: 2:707,*

Strong’s Concordance:
euaggelizo
yoo-ang-ghel-id'-zo
From G2095 and G32; to announce good news (“evangelize”) especially the gospel: - 
declare, bring (declare, show) glad (good) tidings, preach (the gospel).

Origins of our understanding of the Gospel
Pocket Oxford English Dictionary Definitions:
o The Teachings of Jesus.
o Gospel – the record of Jesus’s life and teaching in the first four books of the New Testament.
o Gospel – each of the first four books of the New Testament.
o Also gospel truth about something absolutely true.
o Also Gospel music a style of African American religious singing.
· Origin: Old English: ‘good news’.

Original references to the Gospel
The International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia gives us some good references to the Gospel
gos´pel (το` ευ?αγγε´λιον, tó euaggélion): The word gospel is derived from the Anglo-Saxon word 
which meant “the story concerning God.” In the New Testament the Greek word euaggelion, means “good news.” 
It proclaims tidings of deliverance. The word sometimes stands for the record of the life of our Lord (Mar_1:1), 
embracing all His teachings, as in Act_20:24. But the word “gospel” now has a peculiar use, and describes primarily the message 
which Christianity announces. “Good news” is its significance. It means a gift from God. It is the proclamation of the forgiveness of sins 
and sonship with God restored through Christ. It means remission of sins and reconciliation with God. The gospel is not only a message of salvation, 
but also the instrument through which the Holy Spirit works (Rom_1:16).

In the New Testament the gospel never means simply a book, but rather the message which Christ and His apostles announced. 
In some places it is called “the gospel of God,” as, for example, Rom_1:1; 1Th_2:2, 1Th_2:9; 1Ti_1:11. 
In others it is called “the gospel of Christ” (Mar_1:1; Rom_1:16; Rom_15:19; 1Co_9:12, 1Co_9:18; Gal_1:7). 
In another it is called “the gospel of the grace of God” (Act_20:24); in another “the gospel of peace” (Eph_6:15); 
in another “the gospel of your salvation” (Eph_1:13); and in yet another “the glorious gospel” (2Co_4:4 the King James Version). 
The gospel is Christ: He is the subject of it, the object of it, and the life of it. It was preached by Him (Mat_4:23; Mat_11:5; Mar_1:14; Luk_4:18 margin), 
by the apostles (Act_16:10; Rom_1:15; Rom_2:16; 1Co_9:16) and by the evangelists (Act_8:25).

Origins of the The Light of the Gospel that is the Glory of Christ that shines through us!
2Co 4:1 Therefore, since we have this ministry, as we have received mercy, we do not lose heart.
2Co 4:2 But we have renounced the hidden things of shame, not walking in craftiness nor handling the word of God deceitfully, 
but by manifestation of the truth commending ourselves to every man's conscience in the sight of God. 
2Co 4:3 But even if our gospel is veiled, it is veiled to those who are perishing,
2Co 4:4 whose minds the god of this age has blinded, who do not believe, lest the light of the gospel of the glory of Christ, who is the image of God, 
should shine on them. 
2Co 4:5 For we do not preach ourselves, but Christ Jesus the Lord, and ourselves your bondservants for Jesus' sake.
2Co 4:6 For it is the God who commanded light to shine out of darkness, who has shone in our hearts to give the light of the 
knowledge of the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ. 
2Co 4:7 But we have this treasure in earthen vessels, that the excellence of the power may be of God and not of us.
2Co 4:8 We are hard-pressed on every side, yet not crushed; we are perplexed, but not in despair;
2Co 4:9 persecuted, but not forsaken; struck down, but not destroyed—
2Co 4:10 always carrying about in the body the dying of the Lord Jesus, that the life of Jesus also may be manifested in our body.

What we notice here is that the Gospel comes to us through Christ's preachers in our lives. Someone had to tell us the Good News, 
and that someone had to be sent to us from God. When we heard the Gospel of the Kingdom we received faith to call on the name of the Lord 
and be saved. Let's remember our role to preach the Gospel of Christ and make disciples of all nations!