My second visit to Uganda

2010/09/03

My second visit to Uganda 2010

I spent some time with a friend at the airport and weenjoyed the fellowship so much that I didn’t see how the time flew. When wesaid goodbye, I realised that the gates to the plane were already closed! I ranto the far gate until my lungs felt like bursting, but when I got there theglass doors were closed and the staff had already left. The plane was about toleave.

‘I need a miracle here!’ I said.

‘Sorry Sir, you are too late. The plane door is shut.’

‘You don’t understand, I have to be on that plane. I am amissionary and I have to get onto that plane. Do a miracle in Jesus Name!’

‘Sorry Sir, it is closed.’

Then a young lady came forward and opened up the computeragain and went through the tickets. She phoned a superior who came after awhile.

‘Are you passenger Pelser?’

‘Yes! Yes!’

‘Oh, we see there has been confusion regarding your ticket!It is our fault!’ She explained.

I didn’t understand what she was talking about, but agreedwith her anyway!

‘So if it is your problem, are you going to do somethingabout it?’ I eagerly enquired.

‘Give me a moment!’ She got onto her cell phone, phoned thepilot and the air hostess in the plane and they opened the door for me again! Sheled me down the chute through the glass doors to the door of the plane to letme board the plane.

Phew! What a close shave. It is a miracle and a sign to methat I had to go to Uganda.

Jesus is Lord in Uganda

‘Jesus ye mo kama!’ Jesus is Lord in Swahili.

I arrived at Entebbe airport after 7pm and Richard Ssendiand a kombi full of people were there to meet me. They took me to Kayunga,about a two hour drive from there where we would have our first meetings inNazigo, a suburb in the district. It is the area in which Richard and his wifeChristine grew up during the reign of terror of Idi Amin.

In a make-shift, wooden structure, with a mud and dung floorwe met together for a few days to worship, pray and share the Word of God. Thetheme of the conference was ‘Unity and Prayer’. Many pastors and their wivescame from rural areas to attend the meetings. Some drove as far as 300Kilometres.

We sang simple songs to a reggae beat and danced on the dungfloor:

I will sing – in the house of the Lord!

I will dance – in the house of the Lord!

I will clap – in the house of the Lord!

And when the song was over the song leader got us to sitdown by making us sing:

I will sit – in the house of the Lord!

My acting prophecy about Unity

They were preparing lunch outside on the open fire. I askedfor 6 raw sweet potatoes and 6 boiled ones. Then I took each sweet potato anddescribed its characteristics. The one was big, the other small, the one wasimpressive, the other: not at all! So they were all easily recognised. Icompared them to churches and personalities.

Then I took a sharp knife and peeled the sweet potatoes.They were still easily recognisable because they still had the same shape eventhough they were peeled. The next thing I did was to cut them up into pieces.Now it was no longer easy to say which piece belonged to which sweet potato! Itook the 6 boiled potatoes, cut them up into pieces and chucked them into awooden mortar and used a pestle to mash them all together into one big pulp.

‘Now where is the big one?’ I asked them.

‘It is in there!’ they pointed to the mortar.

‘Where is the small one?’

‘It is in there!’

But there was no distinction any longer: they were all one!That is how we are all one in Christ Jesus: there is no competition to see whohas the fastest growing church in the city and who has the most home cells.There is no competition in Christ. There is no Jew or Gentile, no male orfemale: we are all one in Christ. When we are all one in Christ the devil canbring no division in the church.

I fed them mashed sweet potatoes from the mortar and I atesome of it as well.

‘You see, you can only feed people in a church where thereis unity!’ They got the message!

What they never realised is that the pastor of a church isalso a member of the church. Jesus is the Head, not the pastor! If we are allone, we will have the same care for each other.

 

The same care for each other

As I preached I noticed a lady with broken glasses. It hungon one ear and on her nose. The other side had no attachment. I went to her inthe crowd and took her glasses.

‘Would you like to wear such glasses?’ I asked them.

‘No!’ the response came.

I asked her how much a new pair would cost. It would costabout 15 000 Shillings. So I said:

‘Come we are going to take up an offering for her, so thatshe can buy new glasses!’ Slowly but surely people came forward and put moneyin the offering basket. After a while we had the amount. I gave an extra amountand told her that was for her personal needs, not for the glasses.

Then I rebuked the pastors, because none of themspontaneously got up and gave money towards the glasses. I said, you alwaystake up offerings from people, but when it is your time to give, you don’tmove! One of them got up and gave something. They had learned their lesson.

A new school in Uganda

Richard went to show me where he lived and where he hadbuilt a school. He lives in a two roomed home with 9 people – four of which arestudents at his school. They are all orphans who cannot afford to go to school.He loaned the money from the bank to buy land and build a school, for educationis a great need in Uganda. There is a principal and several people teachdifferent subjects. The students who pay their fees help to pay off the loan atthe bank. He wants to construct dormitories so that students can come from therural areas and stay at the school.

Wherever we went little children called me ‘Muzungu’ (whiteman).

Abali – how are you

Muzuli – I’m fine

Weraba – goodbye

Mere – food

We ate Matoke – it is plantain banana pulp. Katogo is minceand Kasava mixed.

From Kayunga we went back to Kampala. I stayed in the oldesthotel in the city: Speke hotel. It was named after one of the famous Britishexplorers: John Banning Speke. He and Burton ‘discovered’ Lake Victoria. Therooms were very, very large, like the old colonial hotels. The hotel is run byIndians from India.